May 26, 2016 Jewish Women of Rebetika, w/Carol Freeman


NY Klezmer Series Proudly Presents:
The Jewish Women of Rebetika featuring Carol Freeman, Adam Moss, Eylem Basaldi

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Rebetika collage copy

The New York Klezmer Series presents

The JEWISH WOMEN of REBETIKA

Legendary Greek Jewish Singers of the ‘20s, ‘30s, and 40’s

Roza Eskenazi. Amalia Baca, Stella Haskil, Victoria Hazan

Thursday, May 26th

REBETIKA WORKSHOP 6:30 pm  Led by Carol Freeman

CONCERT 8:30 pm

featuring
Carol Freeman – Vocals
Eylem Basaldi – Violin
Adam Good – Oud

followed by Jam Session

JALOPY Theater and School of Music
315 Columbia Street Brooklyn 11231 718-395-3214 www.Jalopy.biz
Concert $15  Workshop $25  Full NIght Pass $35 includes Jam

Greek Jewish Rebetika Workshop

This workshop will present the magnificent vocal repertoire of early 20th Century Asia Minor Greek artists, as well as the heartfelt songs of later renowned performers, made famous by the Greek Jewish women who were some of the most celebrated Greek singers of all time. The session is designed to be appropriate for those who are completely new to this music, as well as those who are experienced singers and players of this genre. And though we will be working using the voice, it is designed to be instructive for both singers and instrumentalists, as all participants will get ot experience and develop an understanding of the microtonal scales, asymmetrical rhythms, and intricate ornamentation used in this music, by learning how to both listen for them on the vintage recordings and reproduce them with their voices. The songs have gorgeous melodies, and are lush with embellishment. The texts leave no stone unturned, and deal with scorching love, unbearable pain,cocaine, hashish, cross-dressing, monkey serum fountain of youth injections, harem girls, Hawaiian guitar music, and just about anything else one may fancy. Though the repertoire is challenging and instruction is detailed and specific, the workshop will be taught in a supportive and super fun setting,

The Jewish Women of Rebetika Concert:

Within the provocative world of the early Twentieth Century urban Greek Café Amans, where flamboyant characters sang about desperate love, life and death, and the seedy side of life, there were a surprising number of celebrated Greek Jewish female vocalists. Included among them were Roza Eskenazi, one of the most renowned Greek singers of all time, and Stella Haskil, who sang together with legendary performers such as Vasilis Tsitsanis. On this side of the Atlantic, Jewish women, notably Amalia Baca and Victoria Hazan, found center stage in the immigrant Jewish Greek nightclubs and community celebrations of major urban centers, as well as within the American recording industry.

All four women were held in high esteem for their extraordinary singing of a beautiful and complex repertoire, both during their lifetimes and again in recent years. Their music, making use of Eastern scales and asymmetrical rhythms, lush with intricate embellishment and profound in its emotional content, found its way into the hearts of generations of devoted listeners.

Although widely embraced for their music contributions, their histories as Jewish women are not widely known. Using live performance and excerpts from personal and family interviews, acclaimed vocalist Carol Freeman, together with violinist Eylem Basaldi and oudist Adam Good, pay tribute to these Greek Jewish singers with a fascinating look into the songs and lives of these remarkable women.

Travel note: Though Jalopy has a reputation of being difficult to get to – however, it is ten minutes from Manhattan on the subway. For those who do not want to do the twenty minute walk from the closest subway, there is a door to door short bus ride from the Jay Street Station.